Is The Walt Disney Company Left-Leaning? Let's Examine the Facts

Posted by Michael Austin on 12th Mar 2021

According to CEO Bob Chapek, The Walt Disney Company is not “left-leaning.”

A sober analysis of Disney’s dealings and social stances suggests exactly the opposite, however.

Chapek asserted as much during the company’s annual shareholders meeting on Tuesday, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

During the question and answer portion of the meeting, one caller — specifically mentioning Gina Carano — asked Chapek if Disney had a “black list” and if the company had targeted Carano for her conservative beliefs.

Carano, a popular actress, was let go from her role on Disney Plus’ The Mandalorian series after posting a number of conservative messages on her social media accounts deemed to be “controversial.”

Chapek replied to the question by simply stating that he does not see Disney as “left-leaning or right-leaning,” THR reported.

Furthermore, Chapek insisted that Disney stands “for values that are universal: Values of respect, values of decency, values of integrity and values of inclusion.”

One fact glaringly absent from Chapek’s reasoning is that the left and right view values such as respect, decency and integrity very differently.

This is perhaps best exemplified in the pro-life debate — whereas left-wing advocates would argue that the decent, respectful position to hold would be to support women’s “rights” to choose to kill their unborn children, the right believes exactly the opposite.

And despite Chapek’s claim of political neutrality, Disney took a stance on this issue in May of 2019, opting to side with the pro-choice proponents of the left.

Following the May 7, 2019, signing into law of Georgia’s fetal heartbeat protection bill — a law designed to ban the killing of unborn infants with detectable heartbeats — Disney’s CEO at the time, Bob Iger, suggested the company might no longer do business in the southern state in an interview with Reuters.

“I rather doubt we will,” Iger said when asked if Disney would keep filming in Georgia.

“I think many people who work for us will not want to work there, and we will have to heed their wishes in that regard. Right now we are watching it very carefully.”

“I don’t see how it’s practical for us to continue to shoot there.”

Another example of The Walt Disney Company exerting a “left-leaning” bias can be found in its hiring of Colin Kaepernick and Jemele Hill.

Both Kaepernick and Hill hold views on American policing and the supposed existence of “systemic racism” thought by many on the right to be radical.

Nevertheless, on July 6, Disney announced a partnership with the two left-wing activists with the goal of creating content exploring “the quest for equity.”

“Equity” is a left-wing aim and the exact opposite of the right’s goal to produce “equality of opportunity,” which inevitably leads to inequity.

Lastly, despite what Chapek may claim, the decision to part ways with Carano also seemed to be influenced by left-leaning bias.

Why is this the case?

Because the social media mob that went after Carano was mostly made up of progressives and left-wing activists.

Most Americans believe Disney to be “biased against Republicans and conservatives,” according to pollster Neil Newhouse whose recent poll revealed a majority of Americans — 73 percent — agreed that Disney should not have fired Gina Carano over her social media posts.

“Disney is finding itself on the wrong side of public opinion on a number of issues — from the firing of Gina Carano to the filming of ‘Mulan’ in an area of China where the government is oppressing a minority group,” Newhouse said in comments sent exclusively to The Western Journal.

“Almost two-thirds of Americans believe that companies like Disney have taken political correctness too far — a result that is probably not all that surprising considering that nearly half of Americans believe that Hollywood and its entertainment executives are biased against Republicans and conservatives.”

This article is originally published on Western Journal

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